All posts filed under: Brexit

Posts on the UK’s decision to withdraw from the European Union and that vote’s impact on the tech and digital sectors. You are probably looking for my side blog, https://afterbrexit.tech, where I monitor individual pieces of EU and post-EU legislation in detail.

We’re out. What now?

Brexit

As I’ve written on my side blog, https://afterbrexit.tech: With the UK now out of the European Union, it is clear beyond any doubt that Brexit is being used as a means for British policymakers to embark on an open regulatory experiment. Legislators across all parties, think tanks, and media outlets are seeking to fundamentally redraft the legal and social foundations of the open web, our access to it, and our use of it, under the […]

What you need to know about a No Deal Brexit

Brexit / UK policy

I didn’t think we’d be here, but here we are. In my capacity as a Policy Fellow at COADEC, the tech policy body for the UK’s tech startups, I have written a plain-English guide for tech and digital businesses to use to prepare for a No Deal Brexit. While the guidance is aimed at startups and scaleups, the advice is applicable to all tech businesses regardless of where they are on their journey.

Parliamentary sovereignty is being bypassed, and digital is in the middle.

Brexit

Today Open Rights Group has released a thorough response to the government’s consultation on the Investigatory Powers Act Codes of Practice. They draw particular attention to the process itself, which they rightfully call inadequate: Open Rights Group welcomes the opportunity to respond to these important documents but wishes to express a profound frustration at the consultation procedure and the unhelpful manner in which policy is being formulated. There was no outreach from the Home Office […]

Brexit for geeks: a briefing for digital professionals

Brexit

Today Theresa May has pulled the trigger to begin the process of withdrawing the UK from the European Union. (This is likely to lead to Scottish independence and the reunification of Ireland, thereby ending the United Kingdom and reducing England and Wales to an atrophied rump, but we’ll deal with that another day.) We have had nine months to digest what Brexit will mean for the digital industries and for those of us working in […]

A woman’s place is in the House (of Commons)

Brexit

Parliament carried on as usual today. Parliament carried on because the people of this country had questions that needed answers. In Parliament’s first hour of business on the morning after, I was one of them. Hansard records that my MP, Kirsten Oswald, put my question forward as this: T8. My constituent Heather Burns works in the digital economy. She has only ever known a borderless, connected world of work. Can the Secretary of State reassure […]

The Brexit white paper on digital: a very short post

Brexit

And so we had the government’s Brexit white paper, a document so vapid that it inspired my MP to tweet that it reminded her of a high school student stretching out an essay to meet the required word count. Eagle-eyed readers spotted the date stamps on many pages of the PDF version indicating that the paper had been finished between 3 and 4 AM on the day it was due to be published. That stunt […]

A fresh round of government evasions on digital, Brexit, and the Digital Single Market

Brexit

There were some intriguing developments announced regarding the UK’s Brexit negotiations and the Digital Single Market strategy on Friday the 20th of January. I can’t imagine why we all missed it. These developments came in a report published by the Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy Committee of the House of Commons. The full report is fourteen pages in pdf, also available in one page of six-point type. Keen readers will recall that the committee’s predecessor, […]

Everything said about digital in yesterday’s Brexit statement

Brexit / UK policy

From Hansard: Mrs Anne Main (St Albans) (Con): I congratulate my right hon. Friend on his statement today. In particular, I liked the section in which he said that he wants to give as much certainty as possible to employers, investors, consumers and workers. Half of St Albans’ economically active population works in London, and many of them work in financial services and the knowledge-based economy. What conduit can they have to input into the […]